Ruthin Town Guide

Ruthin Town Guide

Ruthin: North Wales’ historic gem

Ruthin is one of the United Kingdom’s best-preserved towns. Despite its importance as the county town for Denbighshire its centre has been largely preserved: black-and-white timber-framed buildings are still in daily use as shops, restaurants and civic buildings.

Though barely an hour from Liverpool it’s immediately obvious you’ve crossed a border. Ruthin is defiantly Welsh. For the start the place name isn’t pronounced the way it’s written: you say ‘Rythin’ to rhyme with rhythm. It is perhaps not surprising that the Owain Glyndwr rebellion started when he captured the town, though he didn’t show great affection when he burned it to the ground.

This didn’t put the locals off independence. The first copies of the Welsh National Anthem were printed in what is now the Siop Nain tea room and place names are reassuringly unpronounceable. It would be something of a challenge to ask for directions to Nantclwyd y Dre, for example: far easier to say you’d like to see the oldest timber-framed house in Wales, find its stilted facade on Castle Street, step inside and experience 600 years of history. The building is grade I listed but in case anyone was thinking of altering its interior its newest residents mean it’s even more protected: it has bats in the loft and a webcam so you can see what they’re up to.

ruthun 9There’s history where-ever you look in Ruthin. The Victorian gaol has been transformed into a museum and is the oldest Pentonville prison that is open to the public. It gives a sobering insight into crime and punishment in time gone by and, somewhat bizarrely, has become a popular wedding venue.

It’s actually quite easy to miss the castle, despite the fact it’s more or less in the middle of town and on a substantial ridge. Its sandstone splendour is somewhat hidden by a subtle entrance and lazy driveway but it’s the second oldest English castle in Wales and predates all the more famous castles by many years.

The town today is centred on St Peter’s Square, a good place to orientate yourself, with St Peter’s Church something of a highlight. The building itself dates back to the 13th century though the stunning roof dates back to Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries: the timberwork is said to have come from Basingwerk Abbey. On a more contemporary note Ruthin Craft Centre is the premier outlet for the applied arts in Wales, hosting a succession of exhibitions through the year as well as organising worldwide exhibitions.

Firgrove B&B isn’t actually in Ruthin. It’s quietly set in nearby Llanfwrog on the edge of the Vale of Clwyd. But it’s within easy driving distance and means you can explore the town but also spend some time walking, birdwatching, and exploring the beautiful countryside.

Anna & Philip Meadway

Firgrove is home to your hosts Anna and Philip Meadway. Having both run their own businesses in Ruthin for many years, on retirement they decided to invite guests into the house they had grown to love and to share the ambience of a small Georgian gem. Gardening intensively and looking after their many visitors, they enjoy sharing their knowledge of the area and the many places to visit.

Related posts

Lake district landscape

Wolsey Lodges guide to the National Parks of the UK and Ireland

A History of Britain’s National Parks

Great Britain came late to National Parks. It was perhaps easier for other countries to create National…

Read More

Broadgate House bed and breakfast

Stay in the Wolsey Lodges with Glorious Gardens

The French have cuisine. So do the Italians – and add a flair for art. But the vernacular art in Britain is…

Read More

Highland Games

Discover Scotland’s Highland Games

Scotland’s Highland Games are a historical-cultural festival that has taken place around Scotland every summer for hundreds of years.

The Games is a…

Read More

Search
Facilities
Local Amenities

Compare Lodges

Compare